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HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR RUNNING TIME IN A MARATHON?

WE GIVE YOU SOME KEY TIPS TO IMPROVE YOUR RUNNING TIME IN A MARATHON. NO ONE SAID IT WAS EASY TO ACHIEVE, BUT WHOEVER PERSEVERES, WINS!

Improving your own brand is one of the main challenges of running, perhaps more than that of winning medals competing against other runners. And it is undoubtedly one of the main objectives of any marathon runner, in which it is essential to improve your own times if you want to see progress the best runners watches and a couple of our helpful tips.

Today we are going to give you some key tips to improve your running time in a marathon. You will have to do your part, of that there is no doubt. And no one said that running marathons – and improving one’s brand – was an easy task; but if you are a runner you know that whoever perseveres, wins!

Here we go with those tips.

PLAN YOUR TRAINING IN TIME

Marathons are very demanding races that require the athlete a very good physical shape and excellent endurance. Depending on the state your body is in, you should start training more or less in advance.

If your physical condition is good but you have not yet started your training adapted to the specific demands of a marathon, give yourself at least 6 months to get your body used to the challenges of this type of race. 

If your marks are very high and before you start your training you are already running at high speed with a good level of resistance, you can hurry a little more and give yourself time about 3 months before the big date.

IMPLEMENT SPECIFIC MARATHON TRAINING

Preparing for a marathon and, more specifically, improving your running time in a marathon, does not only require running every day without specific planning. 

If what you are looking for is precisely to lower your brand and therefore part of a very competitive approach, it is very important that you develop and implement specific training to achieve that goal.

Some very useful specific training to improve times:

LONG RUNS

Long runs are a type of long-lasting training, between 60 and 140 minutes, in which the runner trains at a smooth and sustained pace with the explicit objective of improving their endurance

When it comes to long-term training, you cannot start here suddenly: the acquisition of endurance capacity is progressive, so you have to increase the time of dedication little by little.

Most experts agree to consider long runs as the key training in improving your running time in a marathon.

MARATHON STEP TRAINING (PM)

The “Marathon Pass” is the running pace that is just below our anaerobic threshold, that is, the limit where our ability to run with maximum oxygen is found. With this type of training, you will have more blood hemoglobin and you will have the (progressive) feeling of running faster with less effort and more comfort.

The Marathon Pass is a step that does not have to overcome us: we run fast, but for example we are also able to talk to another runner. The goal is to run a long-distance at a sustained pace, so you have to be careful not to start running too fast since if you do, you won’t be able to keep up.

It is recommended that these types of exercises be carried out at least twice a week during the preparation time for a marathon and that they be progressive

To a warm-up phase of about 2km and a cooling phase of the same duration, you should add long-lasting repetitions of progressive intensity in the center :

● 5x2000m

● 3x3000m

● 2x5000m

● 3x5000m

● And so on

REPS BETWEEN 400 AND 1000M

This type of training is focused on improving physical strength and promoting the rapid activation of muscle fibers. It consists of performing numerous short distance repetitions (400, 500, 800, or 1000m), progressively increasing the number of repetitions and decreasing the recovery time.

FOOD

Of course, food is important for any runner, and if you want to get the most out of your training, you have to eat healthy and well from the beginning of your training. 

But in the case of marathons, as a runner you should plan your intake at least one week before the big day, specifically increasing your carbohydrate intake to have more reserves available the day of the marathon.

AND YOU, DO YOU PUT THESE TIPS INTO PRACTICE? DO YOU HAVE A TRICK OF YOUR OWN? WE HOPE THAT WITH THEM YOU CAN IMPROVE YOUR MARATHON RACE TIME AS QUICKLY AS POSSIBLE. PUT THESE IDEAS INTO PRACTICE AND DON’T HESITATE TO TELL US HOW YOU ARE DOING IN THE COMMENTS.

What is plantar fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis is a disorder that causes pain in the heel and in the lower part of the foot. It’s important to wear the best shoe for plantars fasciitis to recover.The pain is usually more severe with the first steps of the day or after a rest period. 

Pain also occurs frequently when you bend your foot and toes toward the shin and may be aggravated by a tight Achilles tendon. The condition usually appears slowly. In approximately one-third of people, both legs are affected.

Plantar fasciitis symptoms

The causes of plantar fasciitis are not entirely clear. Risk factors include excessive use, such as for prolonged periods, an increase in exercise, and obesity. It is also associated with the internal balance of the foot and a lifestyle that involves little exercise. 

Although heel spurs are often found, it is unclear whether they have a role in causing the disease. Plantar fasciitis is a disorder of the site of insertion of the ligament in the bone characterized by micro tears, collagen rupture, and scarring. Since inflammation plays a minor role, a review proposed that the name of plantar fasciosis be changed. The diagnosis is usually based on signs and symptoms, and ultrasound is sometimes used to help.

 Other conditions with similar symptoms include osteoarthritis, ankylosing spondylitis. Most cases of plantar fasciitis resolve over time and conservative methods of treatment. Usually, during the first weeks, people are advised to rest, change their activities, take painkillers, and stretch. If this is not enough, physical therapy, orthotics, splints, or steroid injections may be options. If other measures do not work, extracorporeal shock wave therapy or surgery can be attempted.

Between 4% and 7% of people have heel pain at any given time, and approximately 80% of these cases are due to plantar fasciitis. Approximately 10% of people have a disorder at some time in their life. It becomes more common with age. It is not clear if one sex is more affected than the other.

The cause of plantar fasciitis is poorly understood and is believed to have several contributing factors probably. The plantar fascia is a thick fibrous band of connective tissue that originates in the medial tubercle and the anterior aspect of the heel bone. From there, the fascia extends along the sole of the foot before inserting into the base of the toes and supports the arch of the foot.

Originally, it was believed that plantar fasciitis was an inflammatory condition of the plantar fascia. However, in the last decade, studies have observed microscopic anatomical changes that indicate that plantar fasciitis is actually due to a non-inflammatory structural decomposition of the plantar fascia instead of an inflammatory process.

Due to this change in thinking about the underlying mechanisms in plantar fasciitis, many in the academic community have stated that the condition should be renamed plantar fasciosis. It is believed that the structural failure of the plantar fascia is the result of repetitive microtrauma (small tears). Microscopic examination of the plantar fascia often shows myxomatous degeneration, calcium deposits in connective tissue, and disorganized collagen fibers.

It is believed that abnormalities in the normal mechanical movement of the plantar fascia during rest and walking (known as the Windlass mechanism) contribute to the development of plantar fasciitis by exerting excessive stress on the calcaneal tuberosity.

Other studies have also suggested that plantar fasciitis is not actually due to inflamed plantar fascia, but it may be a tendon injury that affects the short flexor muscle of the fingers located immediately in the deep part of the plantar fascia.